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Events - Future, Trends, Perspectives

an international approach

von Werner, Kim ; Ye, Ding Fach: Betriebswirtschaftslehre;

Events – future, trends, perspectives provides insights into many of the recent developments within the diverse event industry.
International scholars and experts with backgrounds in multiple related fields have taken up exciting research topics and offer perspectives, thoughts and views on a number of current and future issues and challenges.
The topics are as diverse as the industry itself and include discussions on gender and diversity, disruptive technologies, sustainability, psychological effects, the co-creation of experiences, the future of event education and many more.
Vivid case studies and best practice examples are used to illustrate current and future developments and to spark discussion and debate amongst scholars, practitioners and students alike.

The Corona crisis (Covid-19) is having a massive impact on the events industry. Due to the editorial deadline of this book in February 2020, this topic could not be considered in this edition. We ask for your understanding.

Content:

Kim Werner and Ye Ding
Acknowledgements

PART A

Nicole Böhmer, Kim Werner and Imke Wargin
Female Careers in the Event Industry – Myth, Reality or Future Vision?

Susanne Doppler, Burkhard Schmidt and Liza Funke
Work Stress of Event Managers

Hans-Jürgen Gaida
Marketing Meeting and Event Destinations in Disruptive Times: Future Challenges and Chances

Steffen Ronft
Event Psychology – An Interdisciplinary Approach

Chunlei Wang and Xingdan Wang
Theorising the “Event View” as a Kind of “World View”

Helmut Schwägermann
China Outbound Events – A Challenge for European MICE Destinations

Markus Große Ophoff, Kai-Michael Griese and Kim Werner
Event Organisations at the Interface between Sustainability and Digitalisation

Hui Huang and Hanzhi Zhang
Festivals and “New Retail”: A Case Study of the “Double 11” Shopping Festival in China

Kim Werner, Christina Bosse and Kai-Michael Griese
Slow Events: Assessing the Potential for the Event Industry of the Future

PART B

Aliosha Alexandrov and Kai-Michael Griese
Value Co-creation and the Impact on Marketing and Event Management Curricula

Xing Lan and Yi Ding
Cooperative Transnational Event Management Education: A Case Study of International Event Management Shanghai (IEMS)

Mattheus Louw and Thomas Temme
Enhancing Student Learning in Event Management: Student Perceptions of a Business Simulation Game

Ye Ding, Li Zhang and Chunlei Wang
Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in Event Management: Case studies from Chinese Universities

Gernot Gehrke
Researching the Future of Event Education

Steffen Ronft
Appendix: Further references concerning psychological effects and phenomena
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Details
ISBN 9783825252533
UTB-Titelnummer 5253
Auflagennr. 1. Aufl.
Erscheinungsjahr 2020
Erscheinungsdatum 11.05.2020
Einband Kartoniert
Formate UTB L (17 x 24 cm)
Originalverlag UVK
Umfang 366 S.
Inhalt
Acknowledgements 5
1 Introduction (Kim Werner and Ye Ding) 21
1.1 Events: Future, Trends, Perspectives 21
1.2 What Students and Lecturers can take away from this Book 22
1.3 The Structure of this Book 23
1.4 Bibliography 27
PART A 29
2 Female Careers in the Event Industry – Myth, Reality or Future Vision? (Nicole Böhmer, Kim Werner and Imke Wargin) 31
2.1 Introduction
2.2 The Relevance of Gender Differences in the Event Industry 32
2.2.1 Gendered preferences and gender gap 32
2.2.2 Current gender issues in the event industry 34
2.2.3 Current situation of horizontal and vertical segregation in the German event industry 35
2.2.4 International developments within the industry 36
2.2.5 Current state of research 37
2.3 Current Career Concepts 39
2.4 Event Careers: Dream Career or Accidental Success? 40
2.4.1 Methodology 40
2.4.2 Results 41
2.4.3 Discussion and implications 42
2.4.4 Limitations and future research avenues 44
2.5 Conclusions and Summary 45
2.6 Questions 46
2.7 Further Readings 47
2.8 Bibliography 47
3 Work Stress of Event Managers (Susanne Doppler, Burkhard Schmidt and Liza Funke) 51
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Stress in the Event Industry 53
3.2.1 Defining stress 53
3.2.2 Job demands and resources 56
3.2.3 Health problems within the JD-R model 58
3.3 Method 59
3.3.1 Sample 59
3.3.2 Interviews 60
3.4 Results 60
3.4.1 Job demands 60
3.4.2 Job resources 62
3.5 Summary 63
3.6 Questions 64
3.7 Further Readings 64
3.8 Bibliography 64
4 Marketing Meeting and Event Destinations in Disruptive Times: Future Challenges and Chances (Hans-Jürgen Gaida) 69
4.1 Introduction 69
4.2 Preliminaries 71
4.2.1 ICCA, the International Congress and Convention Association 72
4.2.2 World Economic Forum and Global Power City Index 73
4.2.3 UNWTO, the World Tourism Organization 74
4.2.4 IATA, the International Air Transport Association 75
4.3 Distruptive Technologies 79
4.4 Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality 80
4.5 Smart Cities 81
4.6 Urban Mobility 83
4.7 Aviation 87
4.8 Sustainability 88
4.9 Summary 89
4.10 Questions 92
4.11 Further Readings 92
4.12 Bibliography 92
5 Event Psychology – An Interdisciplinary Approach (Steffen Ronft) 97
5.1 Introduction and Definition 97
5.2 Characteristics of Psychological Disciplines 99
5.2.1 General psychology 100
5.2.2 Social psychology 100
5.2.3 Differential psychology 101
5.2.4 Psychology of perception 101
5.2.5 Environmental psychology 101
5.2.6 Cognitive psychology 101
5.2.7 Biological psychology 102
5.3 Goals and Effectiveness 102
5.3.1 Enhancement of efficiency of live communication 103
5.3.2 Specific relevance for professional event management 103
5.3.3 Specific relevance for brand communication 104
5.3.4 Specific relevance for trade fairs 104
5.4 Influence on / Manipulation of Event Participants 104
5.4.1 General conditions 104
5.4.2 Examples of psychological manipulation effects 105
5.4.3 Examples of sensory manipulating effects 108
5.5 History and Perspectives 109
5.5.1 Definition and development 109
5.5.2 Protagonists developing event psychology 110
5.5.3 Multisensory communication as a limitation of digital trans- formation? 110
5.6 Summary 111
5.7 Questions 111
5.8 Further Readings 111
5.9 Bibliography 112
6 Theorising the “Event View” as a Kind of “World View” (Chunlei Wang and Xingdan Wang) 115
6.1 Introduction 115
6.2 Literature Review 117
6.2.1 Special events and people’s existence 118
6.2.2 Special events and life transformation 119
6.2.3 Special events and group life 119
6.2.4 Special events and experiential learning 120
6.3 The Construction of “the Event View as a World View” 120
6.3.1 The theoretical basis 120
6.3.2 The “event view as a kind of world view” 120
6.3.3 The core of special events: the experience and the attached meaning 121
6.3.4 Rituals and the symbolic meaning of an event 122
6.3.5 Special events and the accumulation and integration of cognitive elements 122
6.3.6 The four-dimensional analysis framework of “objective-stakeholder- process-change” 123
6.4 Construction of the “Event View” 124
6.5 The Connotations of “the Event View as a World View” 126
6.5.1 Experience and meaning 126
6.5.2 Scene 126
6.5.3 Rituals 128
6.5.4 Mixed objectives 129
6.5.5 Multiple stakeholders 129
6.5.6 The whole process 130
6.5.7 Reconstruction 130
6.6 Theoretical and Practical Implications 131
6.7 Summary 132
6.8 Questions 133
6.9 Further Readings 133
6.10 Bibliography 133
7 China Outbound Events – A Challenge for European MICE Destinations (Helmut Schwägermann) 137
7.1 Introduction 137
7.2 The China Outbound Event Model (COEM) 139
7.3 Classification of the Driving Factors 141
7.4 Our Studies on the Chinese Outbound Events Market 143
7.4.1 Quantitative online study with ICCA members (2013) 143
7.4.2 Qualitative study with Chinese event planners (2016/17) 143
7.5 Other Studies 144
7.5.1 ICCA statistics 145
7.5.2 China Meeting Statistical Analysis Report 145
7.5.3 Other China MICE-related studies 145
7.5.4 Chinese outbound tourist (city) consumption (WTCF) 146
7.5.5 The Competitive Index for International Convention Destination. 146
7.5.6 Nation Brand Index 147
7.5.7 Key insights from all studies 147
7.6 Strategies for Destinations 148
7.7 Case Study Berlin: Developing a China Strategy 149
7.7.1 The start 149
7.7.2 Analysis of Sino-German and Sino-Berlin relations 150
7.7.3 Marketing and service quality goals for the workshops 150
7.7.4 SWOT analysis for Chinese event activities 151
7.7.5 China competence for a MICE destination 152
7.7.6 Potential and needs analysis of the Berlin MICE industry 153
7.7.7 China certification for destinations 154
7.7.8 China MICE competence workshops 154
7.8 Summary and Outlook 156
7.9 Questions 156
7.10 Further Readings 157
7.11 Bibliography 157
8 Event Organisations at the Interface between Sustainability and Digitalisation (Markus Große Ophoff, Kai-Michael Griese and Kim Werner) 161
8.1 Introduction 161
8.2 The Level of Sustainability 163
8.2.1 Sustainable event policies 163
8.2.2 Implementing sustainable event policies 166
8.2.3 Sustainable event standards 167
8.3 The Level of Digitalisation 171
8.3.1 Trend studies 172
8.3.2 Business Index Digital 173
8.3.3 Level of digital transformation 174
8.4 The Level of Sustainability and Digitalisation 175
8.5 Case STuy: The darmstadtium, a Sustainable Convention Centre in Germany 178
8.6 Summary and Outlook 181
8.7 Questions 182
8.8 Further Readings 182
8.9 Bibliography 182
9 Festivals and “New Retail”: A Case Study of the “Double 11” Shopping Festival in China (Hui Huang and Hanzhi Zhang) 189
9.1 Introduction 189
9.2 The “Double 11” Shopping Festival 190
9.3 Background of Online Shopping in China 190
9.4 The Transformation from “Singles Day” to “Shopping Festival” 192
9.4.1 The evolution of the “Double 11” Chinese Online Shopping Festival 192
9.4.2 Diversification of participants 192
9.4.3 “Double 11” becomes “Global Carnival” 193
9.5 “Double 11” becomes “Global Carneval” 193
9.5.1 Research design 194
9.5.2 Demographic data 194
9.5.3 Advance preparation 194
9.5.4 High popularity and degree of attention 195
9.5.5 Attitudes and feelings towards “Double 11” 196
9.6 Conclusion 197
9.7 Questions 198
9.8 Further Readings 198
9.9 Bibliography 198
10 Slow Events: Assessing the Potential for the Event Industry of the Future (Kim Werner, Christina Bosse and Kai-Michael Griese) 201
10.1 Introduction 201
10.2 Context and Background: The Slow Movement 202
10.3 Literature Review 203
10.3.1 Slow Food 204
10.3.2 Slow Travel and Tourism 204
10.3.3 Slow Cities 206
10.3.4 Slow Events 207
10.4 Characteristics of Slow Events 207
10.5 Slow Events: The Case of Bad Essen 209
10.5.1 Bad Essen 209
10.5.2 The Historical Market: A Slow Event in Bad Essen 210
10.6 Slow Events and their Potential as a Marketing Tool 212
10.7 Summary 212
10.8 Questions 213
10.9 Further Readings 213
10.10 Bibliography 213
PART B 217
11 Value Co-creation and the Impact on Marketing and Event Management Curricula (Aliosha Alexandrov and Kai-Michael Griese) 219
11.1 Introduction 219
11.2 The Marketing Mix Paradigm: A Review 220
11.3 Value Co-creation as the Cornerstone of the Service-Dominant Logic 222
11.3.1 Overview: Axioms and foundational premises 222
11.3.2 Value and value co-creation 223
11.3.3 Levels of value co-creation 224
11.4 The Future of Marketing and Event Management Curricula 226
11.5 Summary 229
11.6 Questions
11.7 Further Readings 230
11.8 Bibliography 230
12 Cooperative Transnational Event Management Education: A Case Study of International Event Management Shanghai (IEMS) (Xing Lan and Yi Ding) 235
12.1 Introduction 235
12.2 The Core Competences of Sino-foreign Cooperative Education 236
12.2.1 Differentiation and analysis of concepts related to core competence of universities 236
12.2.2 The core resources and core competences of Sino-foreign coopera- tive education 237
12.2.3 The importance of optimised interaction for the formation of the core competences of Sino-foreign cooperative education 238
12.3 Case Study: The Practice of Optimised Interaction at International Event Management Shanghai (IEMS) 239
12.3.1 Positioning Sino-German cooperation 240
12.3.2 Integration, transformation and innovation of high-quality resources between China and Germany 241
12.3.3 The optimised interaction between the cooperative universities 242
12.3.4 Feedback on, evaluation of and adjustment of the cooperation 244
12.4 Summary 244
12.5 Questions 245
12.6 Further Readings 245
12.7 Bibliography 245
13 Enhancing Student Learning in Event Management: Student Perceptions of a Business Simulation Game (Mattheus Louw and Thomas Temme) 247
13.1 Introduction 247
13.2 Historical Development and Basic Principles of Business Games 248
13.3 Organisational Aspects of the Business Game 250
13.4 Problem Investigation and Research Objectives 252
13.5 Research Method 252
13.6 Description of the Participants 253
13.7 Findings 255
13.7.1 Category 1: Personal development 255
13.7.2 Category 2: Course understanding 262
13.7.3 Category 3: Business simulation experience 264
13.8 Recommendations and Conclusion 268
13.9 Questions 269
13.10 Further Readings 270
13.11 Bibliography 270
14 Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in Event Management: Case studies from Chinese Universities (Ye Ding, Li Zhang and Chunlei Wang) 271
14.1 Introduction 271
14.2 Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Talent Cultivation in Universities 273
14.2.1 What is entrepreneurship and innovation? 273
14.2.2 Can entrepreneurship be taught? 274
14.2.3 Entrepreneurship education and innovative talent training 274
14.3 Development of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in the world 276
14.3.1 Entrepreneurship education in the world 276
14.3.2 Innovation and entrepreneurship education in China 277
14.4 Development Modes of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Education in China 281
14.4.1 Modes of innovation and entrepreneurship education in Chinese universities 281
14.4.2 The innovation and entrepreneurship education modes of event management programmes 284
14.5 Case Study: International Event Management Shanghai (IEMS) 285
14.5.1 Optimising the curriculum 285
14.5.2 Practical teaching activities 287
14.5.3 Practice platform: innovation and entrepreneurship, school-enterprise cooperation and international exchange 288
14.5.4 Achievements 289
14.6 Summary 291
14.7 Questions 292
14.8 Further Readings 292
14.9 Bibliography 292
15 Researching the Future of Event Education (Gernot Gehrke) 295
15.1 Introduction 295
15.2 Background and Literature 296
15.2.1 Foreseeing the future of the event industry? 297
15.2.2 (Event industry) trends that have an impact? 298
15.2.3 Foreseeing the future of event education? 300
15.3 Methods and Methodology 301
15.4 Results and Discussion 302
15.5 Summary 307
15.6 Questions 307
15.7 Further Readings 307
15.8 Bibliography 308
Appendix: Further references concerning psychological effects and phenomena (Chapter 5, Steffen Ronft) 311
Autoreninfo

Werner, Kim

Prof. Dr. Kim Werner lehrt Veranstaltungsmanagement an der Hochschule Osnabrück und in Shanghai.

Ye, Ding

Frau Dr. Ye Ding lehrt Eventmanagement an der Shanghai University of International Business and Economics (SUIBE).
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